What are the 5 basic steps of weight loss?

Obesity is a hormonal disorder of fat regulation. Insulin is the major hormone that drives weight gain, so the rational therapy is to lower insulin levels.” – Dr. Jason Fung

In his comprehensive book. The Obesity Code: Unlocking The Secrets Of Weight Loss, Dr. Jason Fung identifies and explains what the 5 basic steps of LCHF, ketogenic weight loss are.

In the next several blog posts, I will lay them out for you.

For LCHF, Keto weight loss success, reduce your consumption of added sugars.
For LCHF, Keto, Banting weight loss success, reduce your consumption of added sugars.

STEP 1: REDUCE YOUR CONSUMPTION OF ADDED SUGARS

SUGAR STIMULATES INSULIN SECRETION , but it is far more sinister than that. It contributes directly to insulin resistance in the liver and over time insulin resistance leads to higher insulin levels.

Many natural, unprocessed whole foods contain sugar, such as fructose in fruit and lactose in milk.

Naturally occurring and added sugars are distinct from one another. The two key differences are amount and concentration. Sugars are added to food during processing or cooking .

Some pitfalls of added sugars:

  • Sugars may be added in unlimited amounts.
  • Also, sugar may be present in processed foods in much higher concentrations than in natural foods.
  • Sugar may be ingested by itself, which may cause people to overeat sugary treats, as there is nothing else within the food to make you feel “full”.

For these reasons, we need to direct our efforts towards reducing added, rather than natural sugars in our diets.

Check all processed food labels to find out how much sugar there is in 1 serving of the product.

Here is the first step to doing that:

READ ALL LABELS ON PROCESSED FOODS

Almost ubiquitous in refined and processed foods, sugar is not always labeled as such. Other names include sucrose, fructose, maltose, dextrose, glucose, molasses, hydrolyzed starch, honey, invert sugar, cane sugar, high-fructose corn syrup, brown sugar, corn sweetener, rice/corn/cane/maple/malt/golden/palm syrup and agave nectar.

These aliases attempt to conceal the large amounts of added sugar.

If it comes in a package, it probably contains sugar.

Asking how much sugar is acceptable is like asking how many cigarettes are acceptable. Ideally, no added sugar at all would be best.

In the next post, we will look at how to deal with deserts.

REFERENCE:

The Obesity Code by Dr. Jason Fung

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