Who is most vulnerable to sleep deprivation?

“Sleep today is a measure of success, a skill to be cultivated and nourished”

Tim Robinson

As we discussed in Sleep glorious sleep, good sleep is an essential part of living life to the full and of maintaining a healthy weight.

It seems that some individuals are more susceptible to sleep debt than others.

A study from U.S. Centres for Disease Control and Prevention found that close to 20% of all women aged between 40 to 59 said they had trouble falling asleep on four or more nights in the prior week.

If women are peri-menopausal and are transitioning into menopause, they experienced even more sleep troubles where they said that they typically got less than the seven hours of sleep recommended by experts for health and restfulness. This is not surprising considering the raise in body temperature and night sweats that disrupt a good night’s rest.

What interests me in my work as a Certified Banting 2.0 | LCHF coach is that my demographic consists of females aged between 45 and 75 who are experiencing the negative effects of insulin resistance such as abdominal obesity, high triglycerides, high blood pressure, high fasting blood glucose and low HDL cholesterol, which together, are precursors of serious diseases.

These ladies are tired of the ever-increasing belly fat, increasing weight, lethargy, depression in many cases, and the prospect of abdominal surgery as a last resort to losing weight.

Their issues around insomnia are yet another hurdle to get over on the path to regaining a healthy lifestyle.

I’m an evangelist of awesomeness which goes beyond being incredibly slim. It embraces sleep, diet, relationships, social interactions and managing stress and this is what I teach those who choose to work with me to regain their health.

The least that anyone can do to sleep well, is to practise each of the sleep hygiene steps listed in the earlier blog post. Sleep is worthy of being prioritised.

 

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